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Lucy's Kimono ~ A Free Crochet Pattern

Believe it or not, I started this in June. I thought it would be a good early-summer-so-sometimes-it's-chilly-at-night piece. But summer came and went and it still never got finished. Then I thought it would be a good transitioning-into-fall piece. But here it is! If you're wondering why that's because this Kimono is over 12,300 stitches and made with almost 1500 yards of yarn. You read that right.  Fifteen-hundred yards.  So I feel slightly vindicated in this delay. 



I considered waiting for a more seasonable time to release this pattern but decided against it. I've worn it quite a few times and always get tons of sweet compliments. I hope you enjoy it! 




Before we get into the pattern, let's talk about the Diamond Stitch. 




Although the repeat is 8 rows, those rows repeat themselves so it's essentially made up of 5 rows. The repeat is a, b, c, d, e, d, c, b, a. In the back panel, this is rows, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2.  Both of the front panels begin with d, so they repeat like d ,c, b, a, e, b, c, and end on aBecause of this almost mirrored repeat, you'll see a lot of "Repeat row __" in the pattern. 

Make sense? 

If not, let me know. 




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Lucy's Kimono

Materials: 
  • Size K/6.5 mm Hook
  • 1,475 yrds. DK yarn (I used Lion Brand Mandala in Spirit, 3 cakes)
  • Yarn needle
Finished size:

Measures 38" across the top and 31" down the sides. Fit is very oversized. 



Gauge:

13.5 stitches by 7.5 rows = 4 square. 

Abbreviations:
  • Ch: Chain
  • Dc: Double Crochet
  • Fdc: Foundation Double Crochet (Moogly has a great tutorial HERE.)
  • Sk: Skip
  • Sp: Space
  • St: Stitch

Notes:
  •  Fdc isn't necessary to make the Kimono. Instructions are included just to chain and dc across. 
  • A ch 2 at the beginning of the row never counts as a stitch. 
  • Stitch multiple is 8+3.
  • I forgot to account for stretch so this is definitely an oversized piece. If you're more petite or want something more fitted, subtract any multiple of 8 dc from the foundation row.

Back Panel:

Row 1: Fdc 123, turn {Or ch 125, dc in the 3rd ch from hook and each across, turn}(123 dc)

Row 2: Ch 2, dc in next st *ch 1, sk 1, dc in next 7 sts* 15 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in last st, turn. (16 ch sps, 107 dc and 123 sts total)

Row 3: Ch 2, dc in each of the next 2 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in the next 5 sts, ch 1, sk 1, dc in next st* 15 times, dc in the last st, turn. (30 ch sps, 93 dc and 123 sts total)

Row 4: Ch 2, dc in each of the next 3 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the next 3 sts* 29 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the last 3 sts, turn. (30 ch sps, 93 dc and 123 sts total)

Row 5: Ch 2, dc in each of the 4 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in the next st, ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the next 5 sts* 14 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in next st, ch 1, sk 1, dc in last 4 sts, turn. (30 ch sps, 93 dc and 123 sts total). 

Row 6: Ch 2, dc in each of the next 5 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the next 7 stitchs* 14 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the last 5 sts, turn. (15 ch sps, 108 dc and 123 sts total)

Row 7: Repeat Row 5.

Row 8: Repeat Row 4.

Row 9: Repeat Row 3.

Rows 10-54: Repeat Rows 2-9 6 times. Repeat rows 2-6 once more, making sure that you end on a row 6. 

Do not fasten off but continue to First Front Panel.


First Front Panel:

Row 1: Ch 2, dc in each of the 4 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in the next st, ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the next 5 sts* 6 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in next st, ch 1, sk 1, dc in next 4 sts, turn, leaving the remaining sts unworked. (13 ch sps, 45 dc and 58 sts total).

Row 2: Ch 2, dc in each of the next 3 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the next 3 sts* 13 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the last 3 sts, turn. (13 ch sps, 45 dc and 58 sts total)

Row 3: Ch 2, dc in each of the next 2 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in the next 5 sts, ch 1, sk 1, dc in next st* 15 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in the last 2 sts, turn. (13 ch sps, 45 dc and 58 sts total)  

Row 4: Ch 2, dc in next st *ch 1, sk 1, dc in next 7 sts* 7 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in last st, turn. (8 ch sps, 50 dc and 58 sts total)

Row 5: Repeat Row 3.

Row 6: Repeat Row 2.

Row 7: Repeat Row 1.

Row 8: Ch 2, dc in each of the next 5 sts, *ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the next 7 stitchs* 6 times, ch 1, sk 1, dc in each of the last 5 sts, turn. (7 ch sps, 51 dc and 58 sts total)

Rows 9-52: Repeat Rows 1-8, ending on a Row 4. 

Row 53: Ch 2, dc in next st and each st across, fasten off. (58 dc)


Second Front Panel:

Join yarn with a sl st to the last unused dc of Back Panel, making sure to rotate your work as necessary to work towards the First Front Panel.

Repeat Rows 1-53 of the First Front Panel. 

Seaming:

Fold your kimono in half, right where the front panels divide. Lay it flat to help you get your measurements right. Mark 11 inches down from the top. Mark 9 inches down after that. Seam the 9 inches between your markers, leaving about 11 inches open at top and bottom. Repeat on the other side. 

Here's a crude sketch to explain what I did. If you can't figure it out (and honestly I can't blame you) leave me a comment or Message me on Facebook.



Fasten off. Weave in all ends and enjoy your new kimono! 

Copyright 2019. Do not reproduce this pattern in whole or in part. To share this pattern, link back to this page. You may sell items you make with this pattern but I ask that you credit me as the designer. I work hard to develop my patterns and I ask that you respect that.



Comments

  1. this is beautiful! thank you for the free pattern! i have two colourways of Mandala in my stash right now, and I almost want to make two of these! ( I have gnome and wizard; wizard is sort of like a muted rainbow to me, and gnome is a bright rainbow...and i mean who doesnt like contrast) looking forward to this being one of my projects for 2019!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you so much for this beautiful pattern! I am so excited to get in on my hook. I am a size xl-2xl. Would I need to adjust? Have a beautiful and blessed week!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think you'd need to adjust. :) I'm about a 2x and it fits me nicely. (For clarity's sake, I'm not the one in the photo; that person is probably a medium.)

      Delete
  3. I'm a plus size gal, about a 2/3x. How would we adjust?

    ReplyDelete

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